Purdue Extension
Making a Difference in Henry County


Program Promotes Healthy Soils

Getting farmers to think about their soils as a living organism that needs to be fed is the first step toward healthy soil. Cover crops were the theme of a Purdue Extension-Henry County event held at Trent and Brandon Dishman's farm. The event was also sponsored by the Henry County Soil and Water Conservation District.

Participants learned that allowing a crop to grow for even as little as 30 days will benefit the soil. The longer insects can keep working, the more plant material can be converted to nitrogen for subsequent crops. As insects move through the soil, they create macro-pores that allow water to infiltrate and loosen the soil so roots can go deeper. This is the "biological glue" that binds soil particles together.

More than 70 farmers from Henry and surrounding counties attended the half-day event. Participants learned about the benefits of cover crops. They also were able to receive Private Applicator Recertification Program credits through Purdue Extension.

 
First-graders Learn Value of Farming

Every year, first grade students from all of the area schools attend Henry County Ag Day sponsored by Purdue Extension-Henry County and Henry County Farm Bureau.

 
Purdue Extension Delivers
  • Every $1 spent on the Indiana Family Nutrition Program is expected to create $35.75 in economic returns.


  • In a recent survey, 94% of Indiana 4-H participants graduating from high school planned to pursue post-secondary education.


  • In a similar Midwest state, an independent study concluded that every $1 invested in Extension yielded $15 in economic impact.


  • Beginner's Guide to Grant Writing workshop recipients received more than $7 million in grants to support community projects.
 

Students have the opportunity to learn about the importance of farming in their everyday life. Each year, the presentations focus on a theme. This year’s theme was pizza and how agriculture is important in the food that they eat.

One teacher said of the students, “They now are more interested in where food comes from and what it takes to make it. When we have pizza for lunch at school they are still talking about all the ingredients and animals they learned about, which are associated with pizza.”

  
View: 
Topic
Henry-Jun-2013-MakingADifference.pdf
Henry-Jun-2013-MakingADifferenceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
HenryField Crops; Youth Development2013Making a Difference
Henry-Dec-2012-MakingADifference.pdf
Henry-Dec-2012-MakingADifferenceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
HenryEconomic and Community Development; Food and Health; 4-H Youth Development2012Making a Difference
Henry-May-2012-MakingADifference.pdf
Henry-May-2012-MakingADifferenceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
HenryEconomic and Community Development; Food and Health2012Making a Difference
Henry-Jan-2012-MakingADifference.pdf
Henry-Jan-2012-MakingADifferenceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
HenryFood and Health; 4-H Youth Development2012Making a Difference
Henry-Jan-2011-MakingADifference.pdf
Henry-Jan-2011-MakingADifferenceUse SHIFT+ENTER to open the menu (new window).
HenryEconomic and Community Development; Food and Health; Home and Money2011Making a Difference